Categories

Aug 03, 2012

Creating a Shallow Depth Of Field in Photoshop

In today’s episode we’re going to be editing an image taken by Angela of the Phlearn team.

The photo is of her friend’s son Sam Stairs. In this super crisp and focused picture of Sam by the water, we’re going to be working backwards. We’re going to simulate a shallow depth of field in Photoshop.

Of course this is much easier to do if you shot it with a shallow DOF initially, but for when you don’t — there’s Photoshop! This is helpful because with a shallow DOF especially in a picture like this, it helps bring the viewers eye to the main focus, which would be the subject. We do this (in post) by utilizing selections, as well as all of the different types of blurs that Photoshop has to offer. One of the best blurs for this kind of image would be the Tilt-shift blur in Photoshop CS6, but we understand not everyone is working on CS6 so we show you how to do the same thing in CS4 and CS5 as well.

Make sure to become part of the Phlearn Family on Facebook, conversate with us on Twitter, and #hashtag your Phlearn inspirations on Instagram. We want to know what the Phlearn community social chatter is about, and who is sharing it. You all keep us motivated to do our best.

Be the first to comment


user image You
(will not be published)

Guests are limited to images that are no larger than 1MB, with a maximum size of 2000x2000 pixels. Only jpeg, jpg, png file types.

  • user image
    Jonathan

    Hi Aaron,

    By using a layer mask as source in the lens blur filter there is no need to clone stamp the background. The mask does it for you perfectly.

    Jonathan

  • user image
    A.D.

    Why not make a channel and use Lens Blur? Are there any benefits with this method?

    • user image
      john

      oh yea, and i learned this technique in your moving car tutorial way back when you just started phlearn!:)