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Aug 27, 2012

Why Metadata is Important and How to Use it

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    maryanne gobble

    Thanks for the DNG info.  I had no idea you could convert it at the time of download!

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    dutchman

    I don’t have Lightroom, so I do this in Bridge with a  metadata template. It works well for me.
    grtzzfrom the Netherlands.

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    Carl Constantine

    The thing about meta data is it can be removed or modified in an image if you have an editor like Lightroom that allows you to do that. There is a tool in Photoshop (plug-in) called DigiMarc which adds copyright information that cannot be stripped from an image. Even if you load a file and copy/paste into a new file, the DigiMarc information stays with the file. So no one can steal your image and claim it as their own work.

    http://help.adobe.com/en_US/photoshop/cs/using/WSfd1234e1c4b69f30ea53e41001031ab64-7728a.html 
    http://www.digimarc.com/ 
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K49o9T1LX-k 

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    Dwain Thomas

    Hey Aaron thank you for this I really appreciate it…DNG is a good as raw right?

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      Scott Mains

      DNG is better than RAW. RAW formats can change over the forthcoming years. DNG is for one term ‘future-proof’ and better for archival. As software such as LR progresses, a CR2 file may not be read/registered/supported, say, 5 years from now. DNG will be as Adobe created it to standardise raw formats. 
      Hope this helps. 

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    Jeremy Hammons Photography

    This is good for people to know, and it is how I update my metadata. But people should also have their cameras setup with author/copyright info. Officially the second you press the shutter you are the owner of the image. But be aware when uploading to most sites, your exif is stripped regardless. Facebook is the biggest offender of this.To see upload a picture and then download it, you will see all your info gone. Also be aware officially you are not copyrighted until you pay the $35 dollar fee and process your photos through  http://www.copyright.gov/. If for any reason you have to go to court it wont matter what you say, unless it has been officially copyrighted.