Photoshop 101-301 On Sale Now  

Amazing Beer Photography With Rob Grimm

Photoshop 101-301
 
  • Easy
  • 15
    mins
  • LR
    Lightroom
  • Join the Phamily

A few weeks back we had the opportunity to join food, product, and beverage photographer extraordinaire Rob Grimm for two days of shooting in his St.Louis studio.

With over twenty years of experience and clients such as Bacardi, Microsoft, Budweiser, and Energizer, Rob Grimm is a highly successful commercial photographer and we’re excited to be bring his knowledge and prowess to the phamily. Make sure to view his full portfolio at www.robgrimmphoto.com!

“Rob Grimm Photography is built upon the creative force that is Rob, with over twenty years in the advertising business under his belt. We take great pride in the images we create, believing that the process of crafting exceptional images is rooted in unmatched production, an open and problem-solving mind, as well as a good sense of humor.”

Lighting Schematic

In the realm of commercial Beverage photography, each piece of an image is shot separately and put back together in post production. The labels are lit primarily by the Visatec, which provides a narrow focused beam of Light. The polarized pan head Lights the bottles from above without creating a glaring Highlight. The Broncolor strip Light provides that even streak of light on the left side of the bottles. It’s not shown in the diagram above, but the warm glow that seems to come from within the bottles is provided by a piece of metallic gold Card stock positioned directly behind the bottles.

Tricks of the Trade

It takes more than Lighting Effects to get beer to look this good. A mixture of water and glycerin is applied to the bottles to create those water droplets. The glycerin thickens the water and prevents the droplets from running. The head on the snifter (that’s a fancy word for cup, folks) takes time to get right. When stirred with a wooden chopstick, the carbonation in the beer explodes, giving Rob control over how large the head of foam is. When the beer has no carbonation left, it is sucked out of the glass with a pump and replaced with fresh beer for another try.

Final Image

Look out for an exclusive interview with Rob Grimm as well as a special collaborative Phlearn PRO Tutorial on Beverage photography in the near future!

Show Off Your Work

Subscribe to Phlearn PRO and Get Access to
Dozens of The Internet’s Highest Rated Tutorials

Go PRO now $9.95 / mo