PHLEARN MagazineZooming in on the Nikon Small World 2018 Photomicrography Contest

Zooming in on the Nikon Small World 2018 Photomicrography Contest

Nikon continues to honor the microscopic world that many tend to overlook with its Small World Photomicrography Competition. Now in it’s 44th year, the competition was another huge success with about 2,500 scientists and artists from 89 countries submitting their best microscopic photos.

Each submission pushed the boundaries of creativity and revealed the hidden
beauty that occurs under a microscope. Yousef Al Habshi was awarded first place with his close-up of a Metapocyrtus subquadrulifer beetle’s eye and its electric green scales that captivated the judges. As he said, “Because of the variety of coloring and the lines that display in the eyes of insects, I feel like I’m photographing a collection of jewelry.”

His photo was no easy process as the final product is a stacked compilation of more than 128 images that hit the perfect contrast between the black background and the insect’s black body and bright scales. Lighting and position was put to the test and he definitely mastered it.

Nikon also recognized 94 images that stood out among the 2,500 entries. You can see an impressive array of insects, crystals, fungi, and even a human tear transform into a work of art by visiting the competition website. But for now, here are the top 10 images that dominated this year’s contest.

1ST PLACE

YOUSEF AL HABSHI
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
“Eye of a Metapocyrtus subquadrulifer beetle”

© Yousef Al Habshi

2ND PLACE

ROGELIO MORENO GILL
Panama City, Panama
“Fern sorus (structures producing and containing spores)”

© Rogelio Moreno Gill

3RD PLACE

SAULIUS GUGIS
Naperville, Illinois, USA
“Spittlebug nymph in its bubble house”

© Saulius Gugis

4TH PLACE

CAN TUNÇER
Izmir, Turkey
“Peacock feather section”

© Can Tunçer

5TH PLACE

DR. TESSA MONTAGUE
Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
Parasteatoda tepidariorum (spider embryo) stained for embryo surface (pink), nuclei (blue) and microtubules (green)”

© Dr. Tessa Montague

6TH PLACE

HANEN KHABOU
Paris, France
“Primate foveola (central region of the retina)”

© Hanen Khabou

7TH PLACE

NORM BARKER
Baltimore, Maryland, USA
“Human tear drop”

© Norm Barker

8TH PLACE

PIA SCANLON
South Perth, Western Australia
“Portrait of Sternochetus mangiferae (mango seed weevil)”

© Pia Scanlon

9TH PLACE

DR. HARIS ANTONOPOULOS
Athens, Greece
“Security hologram”

© Dr. Haris Antonopoulous

10TH PLACE

DR. CSABA PINTÉR
Keszthely, Hungary
“Stalks with pollen grains”

© Dr. Csaba Pintér

With nearly 2,500 submissions, these images are proof that beauty can be found in even the smallest spaces. Although it can be easier to acknowledge the world’s magic with the bare eye, nothing will push your level of imagination and vision more than diving into the microscopic world.

Emily Garces

Emily is a freelance content creator and photographer. Her passion is to simply create, whether it be through words or visuals. She mainly focuses her content on travel but through that, she fell in love with capturing the world one snap at a time so you will always see her with a camera. She was born and raised in New Jersey but considers herself a citizen of the world.

 

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